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The http-conf:server element is used to specify the connection properties of an HTTP service provider in a WSDL document. The http-conf:server element is a child of the WSDL port element. The attributes are described in Table 6.3.

Table 6.3. HTTP Service Provider Configuration Attributes

AttributeDescription
ReceiveTimeout

Sets the length of time, in milliseconds, the service provider attempts to receive a request before the connection times out. The default is 30000.

0 specifies that the provider will not timeout.

SuppressClientSendErrors

Specifies whether exceptions are to be thrown when an error is encountered on receiving a request. The default is false; exceptions are thrown on encountering errors.

SuppressClientReceiveErrors

Specifies whether exceptions are to be thrown when an error is encountered on sending a response to a consumer. The default is false; exceptions are thrown on encountering errors.

HonorKeepAlive

Specifies whether the service provider honors requests for a connection to remain open after a response has been sent. The default is false; keep-alive requests are ignored.

RedirectURL

Specifies the URL to which the client request should be redirected if the URL specified in the client request is no longer appropriate for the requested resource. In this case, if a status code is not automatically set in the first line of the server response, the status code is set to 302 and the status description is set to Object Moved. The value is used as the value of the HTTP RedirectURL property.

CacheControl

Specifies directives about the behavior that must be adhered to by caches involved in the chain comprising a response from a service provider to a consumer. See Service Provider Cache Control Directives.

ContentLocation

Sets the URL where the resource being sent in a response is located.

ContentType

Specifies the media type of the information being sent in a response. Media types are specified using multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME) types. The value is used as the value of the HTTP ContentType location.

ContentEncoding

Specifies any additional content encodings that have been applied to the information being sent by the service provider. Content encoding labels are regulated by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). Possible content encoding values include zip, gzip, compress, deflate, and identity. This value is used as the value of the HTTP ContentEncoding property.

The primary use of content encodings is to allow documents to be compressed using some encoding mechanism, such as zip or gzip. Fuse Services Framework performs no validation on content codings. It is the user’s responsibility to ensure that a specified content coding is supported at application level.

ServerType

Specifies what type of server is sending the response. Values take the form program-name/version; for example, Apache/1.2.5.


Table 6.4 lists the cache control directives supported by an HTTP service provider.

Table 6.4. http-conf:server Cache Control Directives

DirectiveBehavior
no-cache

Caches cannot use a particular response to satisfy subsequent requests without first revalidating that response with the server. If specific response header fields are specified with this value, the restriction applies only to those header fields within the response. If no response header fields are specified, the restriction applies to the entire response.

public

Any cache can store the response.

private

Public (shared) caches cannot store the response because the response is intended for a single user. If specific response header fields are specified with this value, the restriction applies only to those header fields within the response. If no response header fields are specified, the restriction applies to the entire response.

no-store

Caches must not store any part of the response or any part of the request that invoked it.

no-transform

Caches must not modify the media type or location of the content in a response between a server and a client.

must-revalidate

Caches must revalidate expired entries that relate to a response before that entry can be used in a subsequent response.

proxy-revalidate

Does the same as must-revalidate, except that it can only be enforced on shared caches and is ignored by private unshared caches. When using this directive, the public cache directive must also be used.

max-age

Clients can accept a response whose age is no greater that the specified number of seconds.

s-max-age

Does the same as max-age, except that it can only be enforced on shared caches and is ignored by private unshared caches. The age specified by s-max-age overrides the age specified by max-age. When using this directive, the proxy-revalidate directive must also be used.

cache-extension

Specifies additional extensions to the other cache directives. Extensions can be informational or behavioral. An extended directive is specified in the context of a standard directive, so that applications not understanding the extended directive can adhere to the behavior mandated by the standard directive.


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