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In ActiveMQ, message persistence is enabled by default. From version 5 onwards, ActiveMQ uses the AMQ message store as the default persistence mechanism. There are several different approaches you can use to enabe message persistence in ActiveMQ.

The simplest option (different from Figure 14.4) is to enable persistence in a central broker and then connect to that broker using a reliable protocol. After a message is been sent to the central broker, delivery to consumers is guaranteed. For example, in the Fuse Mediation Router configuration file, META-INF/spring/camel-context.xml, you can configure the ActiveMQ component to connect to the central broker using the OpenWire/TCP protocol as follows:

<beans ... >
  ...
  <bean id="activemq" class="org.apache.activemq.camel.component.ActiveMQComponent">
    <property name="brokerURL" value="tcp://somehost:61616"/>
  </bean>
  ...
</beans>

If you prefer to implement an architecture where messages are stored locally before being sent to a remote endpoint (similar to Figure 14.4), you do this by instantiating an embedded broker in your Fuse Mediation Router application. A simple way to achieve this is to use the ActiveMQ Peer-to-Peer protocol, which implicitly creates an embedded broker to communicate with other peer endpoints. For example, in the camel-context.xml configuration file, you can configure the ActiveMQ component to connect to all of the peers in group, GroupA, as follows:

<beans ... >
  ...
  <bean id="activemq" class="org.apache.activemq.camel.component.ActiveMQComponent">
    <property name="brokerURL" value="peer://GroupA/broker1"/>
  </bean>
  ...
</beans>

Where broker1 is the broker name of the embedded broker (other peers in the group should use different broker names). One limiting feature of the Peer-to-Peer protocol is that it relies on IP multicast to locate the other peers in its group. This makes it unsuitable for use in wide area networks (and in some local area networks that do not have IP multicast enabled).

A more flexible way to create an embedded broker in the ActiveMQ component is to exploit ActiveMQ's VM protocol, which connects to an embedded broker instance. If a broker of the required name does not already exist, the VM protocol automatically creates one. You can use this mechanism to create an embedded broker with custom configuration. For example:

<beans ... >
  ...
  <bean id="activemq" class="org.apache.activemq.camel.component.ActiveMQComponent">
    <property name="brokerURL" value="vm://broker1?brokerConfig=xbean:activemq.xml"/>
  </bean>
  ...
</beans>

Where activemq.xml is an ActiveMQ file which configures the embedded broker instance. Within the ActiveMQ configuration file, you can choose to enable one of the following persistence mechanisms:

See ActiveMQ in Component Reference for more details.

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